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55% of Americans Struggling With Holiday Loneliness, While Many Aren't Fully Satisfied With Their Mental Health Insurance Coverage - ValuePenguin

Despite what holiday movies and social media posts might lead you to believe, most Americans (55%) feel sad or lonely this season to at least some degree.

People of all ages experience these emotions, but Gen Zers (ages 18 to 24) are struggling this year more than any other age group.

This is a graph about loneliness by generation

Both men and women feel the winter blues. However, women admit to feelings of loneliness or sadness at a slightly higher rate:

Household income also appears to influence the way people experience the holidays. The majority of those earning less than $75,000 a year deal with some difficult emotions. But at $75,000 and above, a smaller percentage say they feel sad or lonely — though the number is still close to half.

Introverts (those generally more reserved) are more likely to struggle with the holiday blues than extroverts (those generally more outgoing), at 60% versus 47%.

The inability to be around loved ones is the most common cause of holiday loneliness. Other common triggers include anxiety about the coronavirus pandemic (24%) and poor relationships with family (23%), along with the reasons outlined below.

This is a graph about loneliness reasons

At 42%, women are more likely to experience holiday-related loneliness when they can’t be around their loved ones. However, more men (25%) than women (15%) point to social media as a source of negative feelings.

LGBTQ+ Americans feel most holiday loneliness

People of all sexual orientations struggle with difficult emotions during the holidays. LGBTQ+ Americans, however, experience holiday loneliness more than those who identify as straight.

People experiencing sadness or loneliness during the 2021 holiday season

Members of the LGBTQ+ community are more likely to identify seasonal depression, grief and poor family relationships as being responsible for their loneliness. Those who are straight, meanwhile, cite not being around loved ones as a more common loneliness trigger.

This is a graph about LGBTQ struggles

{"backgroundColor":"white","content":"\n\n

Despite what holiday movies and social media posts might lead you to believe, most Americans (55%) feel sad or lonely this season to at least some degree.\n\n

People of all ages experience these emotions, but Gen Zers (ages 18 to 24) are struggling this year more than any other age group.\n\n

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\n \n \n \This \n \n \n\n\n\n

Both men and women feel the winter blues. However, women admit to feelings of loneliness or sadness at a slightly higher rate:\n\n

\n\n

\n

\n

    \n
  • \n Women: 57%\n \n
  • \n Men: 53%\n \n \n \n \n\n\n\n\n

    Household income also appears to influence the way people experience the holidays. The majority of those earning less than $75,000 a year deal with some difficult emotions. But at $75,000 and above, a smaller percentage say they feel sad or lonely — though the number is still close to half.\n\n

    \n\n

    Introverts (those generally more reserved) are more likely to struggle with the holiday blues than extroverts (those generally more outgoing), at 60% versus 47%.\n\n\n

    The inability to be around loved ones is the most common cause of holiday loneliness. Other common triggers include anxiety about the coronavirus pandemic (24%) and poor relationships with family (23%), along with the reasons outlined below.\n\n

    \n

    \n \n \n \This \n \n \n\n\n\n

    At 42%, women are more likely to experience holiday-related loneliness when they can’t be around their loved ones. However, more men (25%) than women (15%) point to social media as a source of negative feelings.\n\n

    LGBTQ+ Americans feel most holiday loneliness\n\n

    People of all sexual orientations struggle with difficult emotions during the holidays. LGBTQ+ Americans, however, experience holiday loneliness more than those who identify as straight.\n\n

    People experiencing sadness or loneliness during the 2021 holiday season\n

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