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National Health Care Spending In 2020: Growth Driven By Federal Spending In Response To The COVID-19 Pandemic - healthaffairs.org

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History

Published online 15 December 2021

Information

© 2022 Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The opinions expressed here are the authors’ and not necessarily those of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The authors thank the other members of the National Health Expenditure Accounts Team: Joseph Benson, Regina Butler, Bridget Dickensheets, Nathan Espinosa, Heidi Oumarou, Dave Lassman, and Lekha Whittle. The authors also thank Catherine Curtis, Blake Pelzer, Stephen Heffler, John Poisal, Paul Spitalnic, Christopher Truffer, and anonymous peer reviewers for their helpful comments. [Published online December 15, 2021.]

References

  • 1 New pandemic-related federal funds required a detailed consideration of how these expenditures should be classified in a national accounting framework.
  • 2 Mandel BA, Ludwick MS. COVID-19 pandemic: federal recovery legislation and the NIPAs [Internet]. Washington (DC): Bureau of Economic Analysis; 2021 Apr [cited 2021 Nov 19]. Available from: https://www.bea.gov/system/files/2020-06/COVID-19%20Pandemic-Federal%20Recovery%20Legislation%20and%20the%20NIPAs.pdf Google Scholar
  • 3 In response to the pandemic, the United Nations Statistical Commission (working group on National Accounts), along with an expert advisory group, developed guidance on how to classify new government funding for COVID-19 response. Several important principles underlie these recommendations, including the recognition that national accounts should reflect the nature of the transactions and their policy intent and that accounts should reflect the real economic effects of the new programs. We used these broad guidelines to help inform the classification of federal COVID-19 supplemental funding in the National Health Expenditure Accounts (see note 2).
  • 4 A summary of the classification of COVID-19 funding in the National Health Expenditure Accounts is available from CMS.gov. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Historical [Internet]. Baltimore (MD): CMS; [last updated 2021 Dec 15; cited 2021 Dec 15]. Available for download from: https://www.cms.gov/Research-Statistics-Data-and-Systems/Statistics-Trends-and-Reports/NationalHealthExpendData/NationalHealthAccountsHistorical Google Scholar
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  • 26 Based on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Office of the Actuary’s adjustments to the published Consumer Price Index for prescription drugs to account for the impact of discounts and rebates.
  • 27 Based on unpublished data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Consumer Price Index.
  • 28 Authors’ analysis of unpublished data purchased from IQVIA.