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Weight loss: Menopausal women should 'find exercise you enjoy' - 'key' to slimming - Express

Nina Gambling, the Director and Co-Founder of LRG Fitness, spoke to Express.co.uk about what middle-aged women can do to prevent weight gain, as well as lose it. Following a healthy diet and doing regular exercise will not only help 50-year-old women lose weight, but also contribute to their general overall health.

“It also increases the metabolism resulting in burning more calories and fat to reverse the effects of weight gain.

“Exercise is also important to improve stress levels and increase self-confidence and mental well-being.”

Nina went on to recommend how much exercise menopausal or middle aged women should be doing weekly.

She said: “According to the NHS, women over 50 should do at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity a week or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity if they’re already active, or a combination of both.”

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According to Nina, “finding an exercise you enjoy is the key”.

She continued: “This will help to give you consistency and commitment to your exercise routine, even on the days when you just don’t feel like it.

“Unless you’ve been diagnosed with a joint or health condition and you’ve been told to avoid exercise, then your goal should be to just keep moving one way or another.

“Stop looking for quick fixes or shortcuts when it comes to your overall wellbeing because, unfortunately they do not exist.

“This can be achieved using your own body weight – lunges, squats, calf raises, press-ups, leaning against a wall if required – or by using weights, resistance bands, cans of food, and so one,” Nina added.

“One misconception is that by incorporating resistance or weight training you’ll all of a sudden turn into a bodybuilder – you won’t, but what you will do is help preserve bone density, reduce frailty, reduce the risk of osteoporosis, help burn calories, and potentially improve sleep and reduce depression.”

Nina stressed that “the way an exercise is performed when training is fundamental to any success”.

“Form and technique are paramount,” she said.

“It is the quality of the training that affects your results not necessarily the quantity.

“In addition, correct technique reduces the risk of injury.”